Specific activities identified by Lake Erie states, the province, and federal governments within Domestic Action Plans are tracked on ErieStat as Investments.  Tracking these investments will enable the adaptive management of phosphorus control efforts and eventually, provide “big picture” views of phosphorus control Progress.

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United States: Enhanced state watershed monitoring program

For an in-depth look at Lake Erie watersheds, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) partnered with several state agencies (New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Indiana Department of Environmental Management, and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality) to track changes in nutrient and sediment loads, including spring loads of dissolved phosphorus.

United States: Phosphorus-optimal wetlands

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is working in collaboration with other Great Lakes stakeholders interested in using wetlands for phosphorus reduction, including The Nature Conservancy, Ducks Unlimited, academic institutions, and other federal agencies. Research and an engineering evaluation will inform decision-making about the potential for treatment wetlands to be a significant part of controlling phosphorus from agricultural runoff in the Great Lakes.

United States: Linking Soil Health Assessment to Edge of Field Water Quality in the Great Lakes Basin

This is a partnership among USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI), the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Department of Natural & Applied Sciences, Purdue University's Department of Agronomy, and the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Water Science Centers in New York and Wisconsin. The partners will conduct soil health assessments in conjunction with edge-of-field (EoF) water quality monitoring projects established in the GLRI Priority Watersheds. The long-term goal of the project is to document and help build understanding of the relationships between soil health conservation practices and water quality effects of those. The focus of this project is to establish:

  • standardized, in-field soil health monitoring protocols for USGS EoF sites
  • to create a robust baseline dataset of soil health at USGS EoF sites
  • to connect field-scale soil health parameters with the water quality leaving these fields.

Michigan Agriculture Environmental Assurance Program

The primary tool for working with agriculture in Michigan's portion of the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB) is the Michigan Agriculture Environmental Assurance Program (MAEAP).  MAEAP is an innovative, proactive program that helps farms of all sizes and all commodities voluntarily minimize agricultural pollution risks. MAEAP was developed by a coalition of farmers, commodity groups, state and federal agencies, and conservation and environmental groups.

Michigan: Support the development and implementation of approved Watershed Management Plans in the Michigan’s portion of the Western Lake Erie Basin

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy will support the development and implementation of approved watershed management plans (WMPs) in Michigan’s portion of the Maumee River watershed and Michigan's watersheds that discharge directly into western Lake Erie.

Michigan: Achieve and maintain phosphorus reductions at four key wastewater treatment facilities

There are four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) that will be addressed in the Michigan DAP, including the Great Lakes Water Authority Detroit Wastewater Recovery Facility, the Wayne County Downriver Wastewater Treatment Facility (WTF), the Ypsilanti Community Utilities Authority (YCUA) WWTP, and the Monroe Metro WTF. These facilities discharge over 90 percent of the total phosphorus point source load downstream of the beginning of the Detroit River to Lake Erie.